Berlin’s Most Fun Music Venue Is A Jamaican Bar With A Fake Beach

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Concert photos by the L.A. Times

(YAAM / Facebook) Also By August Brown November 27, 2013, 2:35 p.m. If any Pop & Hiss readers were wondering where your intrepid dance music writer was the last week, I’m thrilled to say that the short answer is this: a Jamaican vegan trap-music bar with a “Cool Runnings” theme and a fake beach that abuts the Berlin Wall in Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg. Sure, Berghain’s just down the street. But for what it’s worth, I’m siding with YAAM as my favorite nightclub in Berlin, which is the best nightclub city on Earth right now. I was over there visiting an ex-patriated old friend and full-time Berliner musician. While making our nightlife plans, he admitted he had mixed emotions about techno-tourist spots such as Weekend and Berghain that, while essential to contemporary dance music, are kind of overwhelming and an emotional rollercoster to actually enter. Plus, it was roughly 25 degrees at night, and I was woefully underpacked to be standing in line for three hours outside a spot such as Tresor .
For more information, visit http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/posts/la-et-ms-berlin-fun-music-venue-jamaican-trapmusic-bar-fake-beach-20131127,0,7486172.story

Malian music by moonlight seems far from country’s woes

Tamikrest perform at the Sahel music festival in the Lompoul desert in Senegal November 22, 2013. REUTERS/Jean-Francois Huertas

7:30 pm. $12.50. Information: http://www.grcc.edu/music/performance-calendar Dec. 8 BALLETMORE PRESENTS THE NUTCRACKER (Stage), East Grand Rapids Performing Arts Center, 2211 Lake Dr. SE. 2 and 7 pm.
For more information, visit http://www.mlive.com/onthetown/index.ssf/2013/11/holiday_music_to_get_you_in_th.html

Holiday music to get you in the mood for the season

Now Iranian President Hassan Rouhani , who was elected in August on a moderate and reform-tinged agenda, has his own version of the “Yes We Can” music video. It’s called “Aspirations,” and it’s pretty much a carbon copy of the 2008 Obama video, right down to the swelling music and the use of sign language, except that the performers are Iranian and they’re singing in Farsi. Oh, and the speech they’re reciting is not a campaign speech but Rouhani’s Aug. 3 inauguration speech , after formally accepting Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei’s blessing to take the office of the president (Iran’s political system is a little different from ours). Here’s the video, and below that, some snips from the speech, translated into English: I don’t have a full English translation of the speech, but it opens : “In the presence of the holy Koran and before the nation, I swear to the omnipotent God to safeguard the official religion of the country and the Islamic Republic as well as the country’s constitution.” Here are some quotes from the speech, as it was translated in write-up by Washington Post Tehran correspondent Jason Rezaian : The government of hope and prudence wants to bring back happiness to Iranians lives, Rouhani said, referring to his campaigns motto.
For more information, visit http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/11/26/iranian-president-rouhani-now-has-his-own-yes-we-can-music-video/

Iranian President Rouhani now has his own ‘Yes, We Can’ music video

In keeping with this spirit, the local population can attend the festival for free and they wander in and out of concerts unhindered by fences or walls, mixing with a crowd of middle-class Senegalese and expatriates from the capital Dakar. Beneath Mauritanian tents, a storyteller tells moral fables inspired by the oral tradition of Senegal’s nomadic Fula people as children design artwork from desert sand. “This festival is my personal revolt against this idea that the Sahel is just a region of catastrophes – migrants, drought, attacks,” Rodriguez, a Spaniard who has lived in Senegal for 25 years, told Reuters. Among the artists invited were singers from the griot caste, known as poets and historians. Mansour Seck, a blind Senegalese griot dressed in flowing aqua robes known as a “grand boubou”, swayed gently as he sang, his face occasionally bursting into a boyish smile. The lyrics, sung in both Wolof and Fula, recall great harvests and sorrows in the region such as the massacre of Senegalese soldiers at the camp of Thiaroye in 1944 – the increasingly frantic sting-plucking recalling the sounds of gunshots.
For more information, visit http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/11/27/us-sahel-music-idUSBRE9AP14320131127

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